“Calling Occupants Of Interplanetary Craft” by The Carpenters

A Canadian Progressive Rock band called Klaatu first recorded this song back in 1976. The band had named themselves after the alien visitor from the classic science fiction film The Day the Earth Stood Still.

“The idea for this track was suggested by an actual event that is described in The Flying Saucer Reader, a book by Jay David published in 1967. In March 1953 an organization known as the “International Flying Saucer Bureau” sent a bulletin to all its members urging them to participate in an experiment termed ‘World Contact Day‘ whereby, at a predetermined date and time, they would attempt to collectively send out a telepathic message to visitors from outer space. The message began with the words…’Calling occupants of interplanetary craft!'” (John Woloschuk, member of Klaatu)

Our “Song of The Day” is the version by The Carpenters recorded in 1977. The crew on the sessions consisted of 160 musicians. The song appeared in the top ten charts in both the US & Canada. The full length version of the song is longer than 7:00 minutes. Even cut down to just over 4:00 for radio, that is a very long runtime for a charting single.

Today is National Space Day! We celebrate it on the first Friday in May. Ponder the mysteries of the universe with us for the rest of the day on our live stream.

-Wacky Alex

NOTE: The image on the top of this page is a still from the movie The Day The Earth Stood Still, 1951.

“Seagulls! (Stop It Now)” by Bad Lip Reading

Attention über-dorks! It’s finally here! Every May 4th, we celebrate Star Wars Day. May The FORTH be with you!

The day has been observed unofficially since the 80s, but in 2011, a group of fans in Toronto held the first organized event. The event included an Original Trilogy Trivia Game Show, a costume contest, fan- films, mash-ups, parodies, and remixes. In 2012, Disney purchased Lucasfilm and now the holiday is celebrated at Disneyland and Walt Disney World.

Bad Lip Reading is an anonymous music and video producer who intentionally lip-reads video clips poorly for laughs. They then go on to produce music to go with the nonsensical lip-reads.

There are endless musical production that touch on Star Wars. Maybe I should do a top 10 list. As it stands this would be the number one track on that list.

Remember, There is no “try”. Do or do not.

-Wacky Alex

PS: The image used at the top of this page is a still from Rogue One.

I Love This Terrible David Bowie Piss-Take For All The Wrong Reasons

I don’t even know if I would ever play this song on the radio. It really looses something without the video. I am referring to a rather strange cover version of the David Bowie Classic – “The Man Who Sold The World” as performed by Bubbles. Bubbles is actually a character that appears on The Trailer Park Boys, an ongoing TV series that you can find on YouTube and IDK where else. This monster was created in 2016, the year Ziggy Stardust left our tiny planet.

The video is what makes this song worth listening. The vocals are terrible and usually unintelligible. In this way he is pissing all over David Bowie. As an avid Bowie fan, I have a hard time tolerating that but then I remember that David had a good sense of humor about himself.

I am ultimately won over by the crappy low budget production value of this video and all the mugging and posing. Bowie was all about mugging and posing.

So I love this track. Yes it sounds terrible but it goes with the gag video and thus is a fitting tribute.

What do you think? Let us know in the comments!

-Wacky Alex

The Witch Queen of New Orleans

Redbone released the song in 1971 as a single and on an the LP Message from a Drum. Band members and brothers Pat and Lolly Vegas wrote the song combining elements of Southern Swamp-Rock, Native Folk-Rock and Funk.

Redbone was the first all Native American band to reach number one on a singles chart in any country and it was with this song. “Witch Queen” reached number one in Belgium. It hit number two on the UK Singles chart. It got to 15 in Canada but only 21 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the USA.

The song is believed to be about a 19th century Voodoo practitioner named Marie Leveau. Because of the subject matter, the song has become a favorite for Halloween celebrations in the US, UK and Canada.

Here we see a non-official video for the song created by a television pop music chart show from Bremen, West Germany.